Content Analysis

We hold expertise in providing our clients best Content Analysis Services in the form of content analysis research, qualitative content analysis and quantitative content analysis, where in-depth and various interviews can also be undertaken according to the specific requirement of the clients. The efficient analysis of focus groups and interviews are used for creating hypotheses, recognize determinants and also to develop quantity research designs as well as business plans.

Overview

Content analysis is a research tool used to determine the presence of certain words, themes, or concepts within some given qualitative data (i.e. text). Using content analysis, researchers can quantify and analyze the presence, meanings and relationships of such certain words, themes, or concepts. Researchers can then make inferences about the messages within the texts, the writer(s), the audience, and even the culture and time of surrounding the text.

Description

Sources of data could be from interviews, open-ended questions, field research notes, conversations, or literally any occurrence of communicative language (for example, books, essays, discussions, newspaper headlines, speeches, media, historical documents). A single study may analyze various forms of text in its analysis.

Readings

Berelson, Bernard. Content Analysis in Communication Research.New York: Free Press, 1952. Busha, Charles H. and Stephen P. Harter. Research Methods in Librarianship: Techniques and Interpretation.New York: Academic Press, 1980.

Software

Choosing whether to conduct a content analysis by hand or by using computer software can be difficult. Refer to ‘Method and Madness in the Application of Computer Technology to Qualitative Data Analysis’ listed above in “Textbooks and Chapters” for a discussion of the issue.

Content Analysis

Our qualitative data analysis is trusted by industry-leading national and international medical and consumer market research agencies and end clients.

Content analysis experts

Great news – you’ve had a fantastic response to your pilot survey and have lined up telephone and face-to-face interviews with consumers, end product users, physicians, healthcare professionals or other people related to your field of research.

But now what? When the interviews have taken place, how will you manage all the information? What’s going to be the easiest and quickest way for you to be able to analyse the data to discover trends between the discussions and write the report on your findings?

That’s where we come in. Our expert, dedicated analysers have years of experience in analysing data across a number of different fields and specialised areas. We’re continuously providing them with training to make sure they’re up to date with the latest advances in technology and analysis methodologies.

A Quick Peek at Three Content Analysis Services

A long, long time ago, I tinkered with a hack called Serendipitwitterous (long since rotted, I suspect), that would look through a Twitter stream (personal feed, or hashtagged tweets), use the Yahoo term extraction service to try to identify concepts or key words/phrases in each tweet, and then use these as a search term on Slideshare, Youtube and so on to find content that may or may not be loosely related to each tweet.

rvices A long, long time ago, I tinkered with a hack called Serendipitwitterous (long since rotted, I suspect), that would look through a Twitter stream (personal feed, or hashtagged tweets), use the Yahoo term extraction service to try to identify concepts or key words/phrases in each tweet, and then use these as a search term on Slideshare, Youtube and so on to find content that may or may not be loosely related to each tweet. The Yahoo Term Extraction is still hanging in there – just – but I think it finally gets deprecated early next year. From my feeds today, however, it seems there may be a replacement in the form of a new content analysis service

What this means is that you can push a content feed through the service, and get an annotated version out that includes identifier based hooks into other domains (i.e. little-l, little-d linked data). You can find the documentation here: Content Analysis Documentation for Yahoo! Search